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White Horse Styled Shoot
gallery Oct 8 2019
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From the creative team:

This is a styled shoot inspired by Catalan Modernism. Masia Can Borrell is a centenary farmhouse with modernist surroundings and decor - the perfect place for our riders. The colors, lights, life, joy... everything reflects the modernism culture in Barcelona. That is why this farm was chosen for our shoot.

We wanted to show the freedom, joy and the love of two girls who decide to marry as riders in the middle of the forest. The idea came from Gary and Begoña (photographer and wedding planner). We wanted to show all of this, but with a touch of elegance and glamour.

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Sneak Peek
gallery Oct 7 2019
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Education
gallery Oct 4 2019
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3 Ways Wedding Vendors Exclude LGBTQ+ Couples

We've all been there - wanting to attract the right clients, but for some reason, the marketing tactics we're using aren't converting. Often, wedding vendors want to know how to be more inclusive of the LGBTQ+ community. Yes, it's good for business, but it's also values-aligned (which, let's be honest, it's quality over quantity with clients). 

Today, I am going to fill you in on 3 ways that vendors exclude LGBTQ+ couples without even knowing it.

1. Contracts

Those pesky documents that you sometimes have to hassle couples to sign? For a LGBTQ+ couple, these might be a deal breaker. If you use "bride" or "groom" at any point in your contracts, you might be excluding someone who does not identify as either. The best practice is to change all gendered language to "client." 

2. Assuming Traditional Gender Roles

The application of this one varies depending on whether you're a photographer, a venue, etc. But, what I can tell you is this - in a relationship of two cis men - neither person is "the bride" and it's offensive to assume that someone who might be more effeminate is the "female" in the relationship. This goes for having or referring to "bridal suites" posing couples in heteronormative positions and generally ignoring the fact that these two humans don't fit into a box (nor should they!). 

3. Not Discussing Guest Pronouns

Nearly every vendor involved in a wedding will either be on-site for the big day OR will be involved with guests in some capacity (example: a paper goods company). Because of this, it is crucial that you consider that not all guests will use traditional "he/him or she/her" pronouns. If you are a planner, caterer, photographer, videographer, officiant, etc. the best way to address this subject with your clients is to ask them outright! Couples will appreciate this fact and can tell you if there are guests who have varied preferred pronouns. After all, one of the biggest concerns of couples getting married is whether or not their guests are having a good time. By bringing up pronouns ahead of time, this will reassure your clients that they are in good hands.

There are so many other ways to make sure that your brand and business are inclusive of the LGBTQ+ community.

If you feel lost and could use some more guidance, you're in luck - we offer consulting services. This could be one hour combing through your social and website or it could be a deep dive into your brand and content strategy. If you want to learn more, email me at bonjour@handhweddings.com

Did you nail this exercise and you feel ready to work with all the LGBTQ+ couples? You can request an invite to the vendor list here

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A Thought For Thursday
gallery Oct 3 2019
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"The book of love is long and boring

No one can lift the damn thing

It's full of charts and facts and figures

And instructions for dancing

But I

I love it when you read to me

And you

You can read me anything"

-Peter Gabriel

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Mike Title_key Patrick

Real Wedding
gallery Oct 1 2019
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Fun Fall Styled Shoot

Inspiration Story:

The Frederick Douglass Maritime Museum opened their latest show this past February (2019) called NonToxic Masculinity featuring artists Jerry Prettyman and E.L. Briscoe. The content of the show is meant to show a re-interpretation of the stereotypical view of masculinity of men of color, both young and old.

Upon visiting the museum (and event venue), we left knowing we needed to add to this conversation by showing the juxtaposition of masculinity and tenderness, as depicted by our couple, Michael and Patrick. We used soft textures of linen and polka dots, often renowned as feminine, and paired them with leather, wood, and copper, often seen as a hyper-masculine aesthetic.

Yvonne, Coffee & Calligraphy, was the first vendor we contacted to carry out our vision. She lettered Yeah Yeah Yeah's lyrics on a large piece of leather we sourced. The lyrics were both romantic and formal, eloquently written by one of our favorite bands. Yvonne lettered with paint on hide, with soft cascading letters - this made the perfect backdrop for the ceremony space. We asked Lynn, Lynn Cipollone Designs, to create an invitation suite, which she paired with a handmade leather envelope. From there, we sourced copper flatware, wooden chargers, and vintage glassware in amber and paired them with indigo linen napkins and an unbelievably soft yet textured centerpiece from Steelcut Flower Co. Brooke Michelle was the missing piece of the puzzle. She is an unbelievably charismatic and photographs with intent. Her images captured the romance, the friendship, and the spirit of the blurred lines between those roles.

Each of the vendors on our team interpreted our call for this shoot in their own way, providing pieces that truly narrated the vision we created this past winter. We could not be more proud of the team we worked with or of the final product.     

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